Posted by: Anne E. Stuart | March 25, 2012

Sunday Six – March 25, 2012

I apologize for the delayed post this week. I was busy playing catch-up from being away the second part of Spring Break. Then, Thursday, I left straight from work to drive to Tarrytown, NY for the 26th Annual Farmingdale Conference on the Teaching of Psychology. Conference was great, my presentation with colleagues went well, but I didn’t have access to the internet. (More accurately, I wasn’t willing to pay the hotel’s ridiculous fees to get internet access.)

So, with a bit of delay, here are this week’s links:

Psych Your Mind (Aime Gordon) – March 19, 2012

We all believe we see the world the way it really is and that others see it the same way as we do. However, this is not the case. Two (or more) individuals can view the same situation very differently, and these different perspectives can breed conflict. In this repost at Psych Your Mind, Aime Gordan states what we can do in these situations of conflict.

Medical News Today – March 23, 2012

The findings of a study by James Brockmole of Notre Dame and colleagues at Purdue University are particularly timely in light of the recent news regarding the Trayvon Martin case in Florida. It is also timely, as my Honors students were recently talking about the Amadou Diallo shooting from 1999. (The students were reading a chapter from Malcolm Gladwell’s Blink.)

The findings of the recent study is that participants were more likely to report seeing a gun in an image when the participants, themselves, were holding a gun. The researchers found that simply showing the participants a gun was not enough to increase reports of seeing a gun.

Psychology Today: Prescriptions for Life (Susan Biali, M.D.) – March 20, 2012

The title of this link may seem a bit odd at first glance. Why would I be suggesting you read a survival guide to weddings and family gatherings? Because, you may not need the survival guide, but someone you know (like ME) can really benefit from the survival guide, and that person needs you to understand her.

Susan Biali describes the Highly Sensitive Person (HSP) as “someone who is vulnerable to being overwhelmed by the chaos and overstimulation of normal life, and is frequently misunderstood or mislabled as being shy or ‘weird’.”

The term HSP, or the scientific name Sensory-Processing Sensitivity (SPS), was coined by psychologist Elaine Aron. Aron states that roughly 15 – 20% of the population is affected by this pattern of behavior. Too many to be considered a disorder.

PsyBlog (Jeremy Dean) – March 21, 2012

I hope this link is of interest to many of you, but particularly to my PSY102 students as we are currently covering the Social Psychology chapter in class.

In this post, Jeremy Dean describes eight areas of research conducted by Stanley Milgram.

The New York Times: Sunday Review (Annie Murphy Paul) – March 17, 2012

This New York Times opinion piece describes research that demonstrates how different words activate different parts of the brain. For instance, words associated with strong scents (e.g., cinnamon) activate the brain areas associated with smell.

The research suggests that reading fiction does, in fact, affect us.

Psychology Today: Changepower (Meg Selig) – March 16, 2012

As we have all learned at some point in our lives, complaining is a compliance technique. We can complain to get someone to yield to our request. However, as Meg Selig points out, we must complain the right way in order to get the person to comply. Selig lays out nine strategies that make one’s complaining more effective.

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Responses

  1. “The Highly Sensitive (HSP) Introvert Survival Guide to Weddings & Family Gatherings” was interesting because I can definitely relate to the need to just get away from people when you have had enough. I find it interesting that 15-20% of the population is affected by this disorder because I have only known one other person who enjoys being alone as much as I do. While it may not be the article on Highly Sensitive people and their behaviors, the author’s methods seem very similar to things I do whenever I can not stand to be with company anymore.

    “The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction” made me realize how important it is to read books. This just proves the fact that I am not a nerd for reading a lot of books, I am instead honing my social skills. All joking aside, the research behind this topic seems strange to me because I have never thought of reading as a mentally trying activity but apparently my brain is at work making impressions of everything that is worded well.

  2. “The 9 Habits of Highly Effective Complainers” was a very good article. Winch brings up many good points that would be very helpful in getting your complaint across in a proper way. Some people may complain too angrily which will stop those who they are complaining to from actually helping them in any way. To efficiently get ones point across, they must know what their goal is and they must also be calm enough to make this clear and meaningful to the person who is hearing the complaint.

    “How Society Works: 8 Psychological Insights Into Our Social Behavior” describes 8 different experiments or theories on how our society works. The article was very interesting and was able to bring some important things to light that people may not have thought of being true. As the lost child study showed, those who lived in towns as apposed to cities were more likely to help the child. This did not come to be a surprise to me, however on the final insight, I was very interested to hear that the theory was that those in the city have so much stimulation of their senses that they walk around as they do, minding their own business, and seemingly untouched by others. I had never thought about that having any thing to do with how many people in the city acted. It is a valuable point however, and I agree that it does help explain some of their behaviour.

    • This is by Shannon Scott-Smith

      • I did figure that out, but thank you for the clarification.

  3. The 9 Habits of Highly Effective Complainers

    This article was very interesting. Everyone complains at one point or another. It was interesting to see how to be a positive complainer. One interesting point was if you are going to complain to complain about one problem at a time. It says too many problems is overwhelming. This was just one interesting point throughout the article.

    New Research Shows That Holding A Gun Makes You Think Others Are Too

    This was very odd but interesting. The study was these volunteers were shown photos of people holding and object or a gun while looking at the picture with people holding an object or a gun. When the person looking at the photo had a gun they were more likely to expect the person in the photo was also holding a gun.

  4. •New Research Shows That Holding a Gun Makes You Think Others Are Too
    This was definetly an interesting article. It just goes to show that holding a gun really isnt the smartest idea. The gun holder tends to become paranoid and misinterprets things as stated in the article. I thought it was also very smart how the researchers would put ski masks on people that werent even holding a gun. This would definetly make a gun holder think they are holding a gun as well.

    •The 9 Habits of Highly Effective Complainers
    This article shocked me. I cannto believe that complaining is actually a good thing. Now that i know this i may complain even more. It is definetly true that it is important to only complain about one thing at a time and not to voice yourr dissatisfication right away.

  5. The 9 Habits of Highly Effective Complainers
    Wow, I really found this one helpful. I have learned some new tricks on how to complain effectively. I am never to angry or enraged enough to go on rambling recklessly. I have used specific manners to address my issues. Just the other day I had placed and order online for an otter box case for my iPhone device. When it finally arrived I was very disappointed in the quality of the product I received. I shipped back my product and wrote the company an email describing my dissatisfaction. I was refunded my money on a refundable item, and I was glad to see it had worked.
    Two ways to right: The perils of naive realism
    In this article I found some helpful tips about misunderstandings. In certain situations there would be times of disagreement where it would be hard to overcome. Sometimes it would a lot of thinking to see it from someone else’s perspective. Unfortunatley not every person is the same and in certain situations one might have to do different things in order to overcome these problems. In other words one must realize that others see things different and jumping to conclusions is not the best thing to do.

  6. The 9 Habits of Highly Effective Complainers
    I’ve noticed that many people only want to complain, but not listen to others complain. But when it is necessary to voice a complaint to a company or about a product or boss, wording is extremely important. It is also important to admit your own faults as well.

    How Society Works: 8 Revealing Psychological Insights Into Our Social Behaviour
    In this part about obedience to authority, this relates to the Zimbardo experiment. The shock experiment I learned about in my AP psych class, and really demonstrates the way most people obey authority. In the lost child experiment, I can understand why some wouldn’t help because they may think it was a trap for a robbery or rap.

  7. Two ways to right: The perils of naive realism: I go through this all the time where i don’t agree with someone elses opinion and just ignore them for a whole day. I think about it now, and it’s ridiculous staying mad at the person, when chances are the person doesn’t even realize what you’re mad about. I admit i have my days where i just won’t take any nonsense from people. But i learned to just stop and think about what i’m going to do next about the situation. if i know i’ve offended somebody, i apologize immediately. When people offend me, i forgive them, but i tend to never forget about it. One thing about this aticle states that helps me in the situation in my life, is to put myself in the other persons shoes. Think about why the person act the way they did, maybe they had a bad day or something and they just snapped. When that happens, i just keep my mouth shut and walk away like nothing happened.

    The Highly Sensitive (HSP) Introvert Survival Guide to Weddings & Family Gatherings: Thank Goodness i read this article, now i understad why pople can be moody and so antisocial sometimes! I experiene this a lot actually. it’s to the point where i have way too much stuff to do and all i want to do is scream and run away from everything! I learned to take things one step at a time. The strategies this article gives, are great to follow actually. There are times where i just need to isolate myself for a bit just to get myself together. It may be crazy but it’s true. I’m a very sociable person, but somtimes i need time for myself. I’m glad though that it’s actually something very normal.

  8. The 9 Habits of Highly Effective Complainers
    I found this article to be very interesting. I know that everyone complains at one point or another. It was just interesting to see how to be a positive complainer. One interesting point was if you are going to complain at least complain about one problem at a time. It says complaining about too many problems are overwhelming. This was just one interesting point throughout the article.

    New Research Shows That Holding a Gun Makes You Think Others Are Too
    I definitely found this to be an interesting article. It just goes to show that holding a gun really isn’t the brightest idea unless you are protecting yourself. The gun holder tends to become paranoid and misinterprets things as stated in the article. I thought it was also very smart how the researchers would put ski masks on people that weren’t even holding a gun. This would definetly make a gun holder think they are holding a gun as well.

  9. •New Research Shows That Holding a Gun Makes You Think Others Are Too
    this reaserch is true in many ways. About the participants that are holding gun are more likely that other people are holding a gun as well. I can relate to the exsperiment as well and know from exsperience that people holding guns will be paranoid and they everyone else will. They almost protray as like when you have a fire arm in your hand it triggers a protective mode in the mind. This feeling could cause accidents and mistake of thinking another person have a gun when this is one present in the hands of an idiviual.

    •How Society Works: 8 Revealing Psychological Insights Into Our Social Behaviour

    Its said that people would ignore a child or any young person in a time of need. this comes to show how people feel about young kids these days. they look at kids a juveniles and this why the young generations is lost now.the shock chair research was interesting and it shows that everyone have a dark side to an extent. also the article on its a small world, remeinds me of springfield it is big but socially it is small. everyone know atleast someone that know somebody.

  10. -The Highly Sensitive (HSP) Introvert Survival Guide to Weddings & Family Gatherings: This article suggests several ways to deal with family get together/weddings for a (HSP) introvert. Most of the solutions are making time for yourself, taking walks, avoiding alcohol, and getting your own transportation.
    -How Society Works: 8 Revealing Psychological Insights Into Our Social Behaviour:This article explores our social behaviors in public. There are several Milgram experiments in a city setting and town setting observing what people do or how people act in certain circumstances. For instance how we would act towards a lost child asking for help, would we stop and and help the child or simply turn our shoulder?

  11. The 9 Habits of Highly Effective Complainers:
    As soon as I started reading this article, I was amazed at how correct it was. It really is true, many people do complain and half the time they don’t even know the right person to complain to. The article states that complaining about too many things at one time can be overwhelming, so in order to be a successful complainer take it slow. When complaining to a company about their product be effective, kind, and fair.You are then more likely to get your way. From reading this article I now know of more tactics to be a better complainer.

    Two ways to right: The perils of naive realism:
    This article caught my attention in many different reasons. It talks about how you and another person might see the same thing happen but both view it differently, and tell the story another way. But you have to remember to take a step back,and don’t make any quick judgments. The article gives the reader tips on how to better understand what you partner is thinking, and feeling. I normally don’t care about being right or who won, so in most situations I would just let the other person think they won.


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